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best wrongful termination lawyer los angeles
california wrongful termination lawyers

California Wrongful Termination Lawyer Referral Service

If you get fired by your employer in California in a way that breaks the laws set by the local, state, or federal government, then that's called wrongful termination. To ensure you have the best chance of getting a fair outcome, hiring a pre-screened, ethical, and experienced employment lawyer is essential. It's a good idea to avoid legal marketing. Instead, ask for an unbiased referral to a local California wrongful termination lawyer who will handle your case effectively from day one.

AREAS OF LAW > EMPLOYMENT LAW > WRONGFUL TERMINATION

Guide For Employees Who Have Been Wrongfully Terminated in California

Several exceptions to the at-will employment rule can result in wrongful termination.
 
Employees may file a claim with the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) or file a lawsuit in court if they feel they were unlawfully fired. If the employee prevails, damages such as lost income, reinstatement, and compensation for emotional distress may be available to them.

This guide will discuss the exceptions to the at-will rule, how to file a claim, how to win a wrongful termination lawsuit, how to prove wrongful termination violations, how long you have to file a claim, and the biggest wrongful termination settlements in California. 
 
SECTIONS
 
1. What Is Wrongful Termination in California?
2. Exceptions to the at-will rule 

   2.1 Wrongful Termination As A Result Of Breach of Contract
   2.2 Understanding the Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing Breach
   2.3 Legal Protection Against Retaliation for Reporting Sexual Harassment
   2.4 Retaliation Protections for Taking Family or Medical Leave
   2.5 Whistleblower Protection and Retaliation
   2.6 Retaliation for Reporting California Wage Law Violations
   2.7 Recognizing and Addressing Pregnancy Discrimination in the Workplace
   2.8 Discrimination in the Workplace Based on Protected Characteristics
   2.9 Identifying Violations of Public Policy in the Workplace
   2.10 Other Types of Retaliation and Discrimination in The Workplace.

 
3. How do I prove wrongful termination in California?
4. What is the average payout for wrongful termination in California?
5. How long do I have to file a wrongful termination in California?
6. Is it hard to prove wrongful termination in California?
7. How often do employers settle out of court?
8. Who handles wrongful termination in California?
9. What is the highest payout for wrongful termination?

10. California labor laws against retaliation

   10.1 California Labor Code section 1102.5
   10.2 California Labor Code section 98.6 
   10.3 California Labor Code section 6310
   10.4 Government Code section 8547


11. Why it's essential to hire the right wrongful termination lawyer? 

What Is Wrongful Termination in California?

Wrongful termination is the legal term used when a California employer fires an employee violating local, state, or federal laws. Employment in California is "at-will," meaning that a company can fire a worker for any reason that isn't against the law, out of retaliation, or for no reason. 

Exceptions to the at-will rule

Wrongful Termination As A Result Of Breach of Contract
 
Some people have job contracts that protect them from being fired whenever their employers want. These contracts usually state that the employee can only be fired for a valid reason, which is defined in the agreement.
 
Therefore, the reason for termination must comply with the contract's definition of "good cause" if an employer wishes to discharge an employee in accordance with such an agreement. The employee may file a lawsuit against the employer for breach of contract if the justification doesn't adhere to the terms of the agreement.

Understanding the Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing Breach
 
Every legal contract includes an implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, which means that both parties refrain from doing any actions that would unfairly hinder the other's capacity to receive the advantages specified in the agreement. This includes avoiding misleading conduct and any actions that might provide the opposing party an unfair advantage in carrying out the contract's conditions.

In terms of employment, this means that employers have a duty to work with their staff members to help them carry out their obligations effectively. This covenant shall not be violated by any act or omission of the Employer that is intended to obstruct or interfere with the performance of an Employee's duties, including but not limited to lying, failing to act, or failing to communicate. An employee in California who is let go under these circumstances may have a case for wrongful termination.

Legal Protection Against Retaliation for Reporting Sexual Harassment

Workplace sexual harassment is a type of employment discrimination that is illegal. Your employer is required by California law to maintain a workplace that is free from sexual harassment. You have the right to report them for failing to uphold their legal commitment if they don't.
 
Additionally, it is illegal for your employer to fire you if you report or complain about sexual harassment, whether it includes you personally or someone else.
 
Retaliation is illegal under California law if your employer acts negatively toward you due to your participation in a sexual harassment inquiry. You might be able to file a lawsuit for unlawful termination if your dismissal came about due to your involvement in a sexual harassment inquiry.

Retaliation Protections for Taking Family or Medical Leave
 
There are regulations protecting employees in California from being fired for asking about or taking family medical leave. These regulations also provide protection to workers who utilize their accumulated sick time for self-care, preventative care, or family member care. It is believed to be unjust termination if an employee is fired within 30 days of requesting paid sick leave, and the employer must provide evidence to the contrary.
 
Additionally, if you are protected by the Federal Medical Leave Act or the California Family Rights Act, you are not subject to termination for taking up to 12 weeks of leave to care for your serious health condition or that of a family member. Your employer must demonstrate that your termination was not caused by your FMLA leave if you are fired while on leave under the FMLA or within 90 days of returning from one.

Whistleblower Protection and Retaliation
 
Your employer cannot fire you for informing authorities about their violations of local, state, or federal laws, rules, or regulations. This is referred to as "whistleblowing" and is protected by the law to incentivize staff members to disclose any illegal activity by their employer.

For example, it would be considered wrongful termination if you reported a health or safety issue at work and were fired as a result. Your employer may be liable for damages if they break laws forbidding retaliation against whistleblowers. As a result, you should report any violations of laws or regulations you suspect your employer is making without worrying about losing your employment.

Retaliation for Reporting California Wage Law Violations
 
Under California's state Labor Code, it is also illegal for your employer to terminate your employment in response to complaints or claims about wage and hour regulations violations. This means that if you report unpaid wages, overtime pay, and/or unpaid meal and rest break violations, your employer cannot retaliate against you by firing you.

Additionally, you are shielded from retaliation by your employer if you assert any rights guaranteed by the California Labor Code, file a claim for unpaid wages with the Department of Industrial Relations, or both. This includes speaking up for oneself or other workers and battling for just pay and working conditions.

Because of this, it's critical to disclose any wage and hour laws violations you believe your employer has committed and to submit a claim without worrying about losing your job. You are shielded from reprisals by the law if you exercise your legal rights as an employee.

Recognizing and Addressing Pregnancy Discrimination in the Workplace
 
An employee cannot be fired by their employer because of their pregnancy. Both the Pregnancy Discrimination Act and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act safeguard this. This means that an employee cannot be fired by their company for choosing to get pregnant, having problems during pregnancy, or requesting accommodations due to pregnancy-related medical conditions.

Additionally, pregnancy discrimination is unlawful if your employer rejects or fires you due to your request for pregnancy-related job accommodations, including medical leave. Your company must provide you with the necessary modifications so that you can work safely while pregnant.
 
It's crucial to report pregnancy discrimination immediately and seek legal counsel if you encounter it at work. You have the right to defend yourself and your employment from employers who break these laws because they could face serious legal repercussions.

Discrimination in the Workplace Based on Protected Characteristics
 
In California, there is a law that protects individuals from discrimination in the workplace. This law applies to companies with five or more employees and prohibits them from making hiring decisions based on certain personal characteristics, such as race, gender, religion, or sexual orientation.

These individual traits are known as a "protected class." It is unjust termination if you are fired from your job because you belong to a protected class; this happens when you are a member of that group. This indicates that you might have a case to sue your employer for breaching your civil rights. These protected classes include: 

Age (if over 40),
AIDS/HIV positive status,
Ancestry,
Citizenship status,
Color,
Disability,
Gender identity,
Genetic information,
Marital status,
Medical condition,
Military or veteran status,
National origin,
Political activities or affiliations,
Race,
Religion,
Sex,
Sexual orientation,
Victims of domestic violence, assault, or stalking

Weight or height
 
Identifying Violations of Public Policy in the Workplace
 
In California, employees are protected by the law from being wrongfully terminated by their employers for certain reasons. Employers can be sued if they fire employees who are exercising their legal rights and duties or acting out of obligation to the greater public. These protections apply when the worker is fired for refusing to violate a statute, performing a statutory obligation, exercising a statutory right or privilege, or reporting an alleged violation of a statute of public importance.
 
For instance, while jury duty is required by law, companies cannot fire employees for taking time off to fulfill their duty. Employees cannot also be fired for refusing to break the law on behalf of their company, for as by engaging in fraud. It's crucial to remember that the events leading up to the allegedly unlawful termination must have had some effect on the general public. There must be more at stake than just the parties' respective interests.

Other Types of Retaliation and Discrimination in The Workplace.

Under California labor law, certain circumstances require firing an employee to be considered unlawful retaliation and/or discrimination. These situations are specifically protected under California labor law, and employers are not allowed to take retaliatory or discriminatory action against employees who engage in them.

For instance, an employee cannot be dismissed for asking for benefits available to victims of certain crimes or for lactation accommodations under California law. Similarly, workers who volunteer as firefighters are shielded from retaliation or discrimination by their employers.

These and other particular rules that forbid retaliation and discrimination in the workplace are kept up to date by the California Department of Industrial Relations. Employers must abide by these regulations; if they do not, employees may be entitled to bring a wrongful termination lawsuit.
 
In conclusion, there might be illegal retribution or discrimination if an employee engages in acts that are protected by California labor law and is afterward fired. Employers must be aware of these regulations and take precautions to avoid breaking them.

wrongful termination california los angeles

California State Bar Certified Wrongful Termination Lawyer Referral And Information Service

It is important to use a California bar-certified lawyer referral service to find ethical and experienced employment lawyers to file a wrongful termination lawsuit for several reasons:

Ensuring ethical standards: A California bar-certified lawyer referral service will only refer you to employment lawyers who meet the ethical standards set by the California Bar Association. This means that you can be confident that the lawyers you are referred to will adhere to the highest ethical standards and act in your best interest.

Access to the best lawyers: A California bar-certified lawyer referral service will refer you to lawyers with experience handling employment law cases, including wrongful termination lawsuits. This means you will have access to lawyers with the knowledge and skills necessary to handle your case effectively.

 

Confidence in lawyer's qualifications: A California bar-certified lawyer referral service will only refer you to employment lawyers who have a proven track record in labor law and wrongful termination lawsuits. This means that you can have confidence in the qualifications of the lawyers you are referred to.

Ease and convenience: Using a lawyer referral service is an easy and convenient way to find an employment lawyer. Instead of searching for a lawyer on your own, the referral service will conduct due diligence for you and providing you unbiased and impartial referrals.

Cost-effective: Working with reputable employment lawyers will always save you time and money at the end. 

California wrongful termination lawyers

How do I prove wrongful termination in California?

In California, proving wrongful termination often entails demonstrating that the employer broke a state or federal law, violated an employment contract, or acted contrary to the public interest. The following actions can be taken to demonstrate wrongful termination in California:

Collect evidence: In order to support your claim of wrongful termination, it is crucial to collect as much evidence as you can. Emails, texts, performance reviews, witness statements, and any other pertinent records may fall under this category.

Determine the legal justification for your claim: Determine which local, state, or federal laws, contracts, or rules of public policy your employer may have broken. For instance, you might have a claim under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) or the California Family Rights Act (CFRA) if you were dismissed for taking time off for medical treatment.

Consult a vetted wrongful termination lawyer: Speak with a qualified employment lawyer who can assess your situation and counsel you on the best course of action. They can support you throughout the legal procedure and assist you in determining if you have a strong case for wrongful termination in California.

File a claim: If you think you were unlawfully fired, you can file a claim with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or the California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE). These organizations will look into your claim and can offer to mediate a settlement.

If the DLSE or EEOC cannot resolve your dispute, you may want to consider taking legal action against your employer. Your lawyer can represent you in court and assist you with the litigation.

It's vital to remember that the employee must prove that the termination was illegal. You will therefore need to present supporting documentation for your wrongful termination claim. You can get the evidence you need from an experienced California employment lawyer, who can also help you navigate the legal system.

What is the average payout for wrongful termination in California?

California's average wrongful termination settlement does not have a set sum because it relies on several variables, including the employee's level of harm, the length of employment, the employer's actions, and the evidence produced.

Generally speaking, if an employee successfully establishes wrongful termination in California, they may be entitled to compensation for lost income, benefits, and future earning potential, as well as for emotional distress damages, punitive damages, and legal costs. The exact facts of the case will determine the actual amount of damages awarded.

For instance, if a discrimination-related wrongful termination occurs, the employee may be entitled to compensation for lost income, benefits, future earnings, and mental anguish. In addition, the court can impose punitive damages as compensation for the employer's actions.

How long do I have to file a wrongful termination in California?
 
A wrongful termination case must be filed in California within two years of the termination date or three years if the claim is based on the breach of a written contract. It is preferable to speak with an attorney to determine the precise time frame for your case because some exceptions and special circumstances may impact the time restriction.

Is it hard to prove wrongful termination in California?

The burden of proof falls on the employee in California, making it challenging to establish wrongful termination. The employee must show that they were fired for an illegal reason, such as discrimination based on a protected characteristic like race, gender, or age, or retaliation for engaging in a protected activity like whistleblowing to assert a claim for wrongful termination successfully.

The employee must compile and submit evidence to support their claim. Emails, performance reviews, and witness statements are examples of documents that may fall under this requirement. The employee must also prove that the employer's claimed reason for terminating the employee was a cover for discrimination or retaliation.

How often do employers settle out of court?

As the nature of the case, the parties involved, and other factors can change, it is difficult to quantify the percentage of employment disputes that settle outside of court. However, employment cases, including wrongful termination claims, are frequently resolved outside of court through conversations between the parties or using a mediator.

An out-of-court settlement might benefit both the employee and the company. Instead of going through the uncertainty and expense of a trial, settling might lead to a quicker payout and a definite outcome for the employee. For the employer, settlement may help to avoid bad press, the expense and inconvenience of litigation, and the possibility of a jury's finding against them.
 
Nevertheless, some employers can decide to contest a wrongful termination claim in court, either because they think they have a solid case or because they want to make a statement to other employees about their attitude toward lawsuits brought against the business. The precise facts of the case and the interests of the parties involved will ultimately determine whether a settlement is reached or a trial is necessary.

Who Handles Wrongful Termination Claims in California?

In California, various organizations, including governmental bodies and private attorneys, can handle wrongful termination claims.
The California Labor Commissioner's Office, a state organization that deals with issues involving pay, hours, and working conditions, is one alternative. The Labor Commissioner's Office can look into allegations of unfair dismissal and possibly take legal action on the employee's behalf.

Making a legal claim in court is an additional choice. Employees can retain a private attorney to represent them in court if they feel their termination was unfair. Employees can receive legal advice and guidance from private employment law specialists as they traverse the process of filing a claim for wrongful termination.

It is crucial to be aware that there are stringent deadlines for submitting wrongful termination claims and that if these deadlines are missed, legal rights may be lost. Therefore, if you think your employment was terminated improperly, it is advised that you consult a lawyer as quickly as you can.

What is the highest payout for wrongful termination?

The damages that may be awarded in a wrongful termination action in California are not capped by law. Back pay, front pay, missed benefits, mental anguish, and punitive damages may all be included in the damages that are granted in some circumstances.

Employees have received large payments for wrongful termination in several high-profile situations. For instance, in a wrongful termination case, a former vice president of Oracle was given $1.7 million in 2019. 2018 saw the settlement of a wrongful termination lawsuit involving retaliation against a whistleblower by a former USC employee for $3.8 million.

It is important to remember that every case is different, and the exact facts and circumstances of the case will determine the precise amount of damages granted in a wrongful termination lawsuit. Furthermore, many wrongful termination cases are resolved outside of court, and the agreement's contents are frequently kept private.

California labor laws against retaliation.

California Labor Code section 1102.5: California Labor Code section 1102.5 is a broad law that protects whistleblowers in California. This law aims to prevent employers from taking retaliatory actions against an employee who reports or raises concerns about illegal behavior or activities in the workplace. It also protects employees who refuse to participate in illegal activities that their employer may ask them to engage in.

California Labor Code section 98.6California Labor Code section 98.6 is a law that prohibits employers from taking retaliatory actions against employees who complain about not receiving their wages or report Labor Code violations such as violations related to wages and hours to the California Labor Commissioner. 

California Labor Code section 6310: California Labor Code section 6310 is a law that prohibits employers from retaliating against employees who report violations of occupational health and safety rules. This law is designed to protect employees who blow the whistle on unsafe working conditions or other violations of workplace safety rules from any retaliation by their employers. 

Government Code section 8547: Government Code section 8547 is a law in California that protects public employees who report suspected law violations. This law is known as the public employee whistleblower law, and it is designed to encourage public employees to report suspected law violations by their employers or colleagues. The purpose of this law is to ensure that public employees are not afraid to speak up about any wrongdoing they witness or suspect in the workplace, and it provides them with legal protection if they do.

Why it's essential to hire the right wrongful termination lawyer?

The right wrongful termination attorney can give you the knowledge, experience, and expertise required to manage the complexity of a wrongful termination case, so it's crucial that you hire one. Cases involving wrongful termination can be emotionally charged and legally challenging, making them challenging for individuals to handle alone.

A vetted, knowledgeable California wrongful termination attorney can assist you in developing a strategy to seek restitution or reinstatement and understand your legal rights and the advantages and disadvantages of your case. They can also act as your advocate during negotiations or in court and fight to get you recompense for any losses you may have incurred due to your termination.

Furthermore, it needs a knowledgeable attorney to comprehend the many legal legislation and regulations involved in wrongful termination claims. An effective wrongful termination attorney will be familiar with these laws and be able to give you the direction and assistance you need to decide how to proceed with your case.

Finally, having a vetted, ethical, and experienced wrongful termination attorney who is zealously defending your rights and interests will positively and favorably impact the outcome of your claim. Avoid biased legal marketing and request a lawyer referral 24 hours a day; we'll reply within 10 minutes.  

ARTICLES RELATED TO WRONGFUL TERMINATION IN CALIFORNIA
 



 

What Is Considered Wrongful Termination in California?
Exceptions to the at-will rule
Wrongful Termination As A Result Of Breach of Contract
Understanding the Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing Breach
Legal Protection Against Retaliation for Reporting Sexual Harassment
Retaliation Protections for Taking Family or Medical Leave
Whistleblower Protection and Retaliation
Retaliation for Reporting California Wage Law Violations
Recognizing and Addressing Pregnancy Discrimination in the Workplace
Discrimination in the Workplace Based on Protected Characteristics
Identifying Violations of Public Policy in the Workplace
Other Types of Retaliation and Discrimination in The Workplace
How do I prove wrongful termination in California?
What is the average payout for wrongful termination in California?
How long do I have to file a wrongful termination in California?
Is it hard to prove wrongful termination in California?
How often do employers settle out of court?
Who Handles Wrongful Termination Claims in California?
What is the highest payout for wrongful termination?
California labor laws against retaliation
California Labor Code section 1102.5
California Labor Code section 98.6
California Labor Code section 6310
Government Code section 8547
Why it's essential to hire the right wrongful termination lawyer?
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